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Convection

 Convection

  • Convection is the process by which heat is transferred by the movement of a heated fluid (gas or liquid). For example, an incandescent light bulb will when heated, become increasingly hotter until the air surrounding it begins to move. The motion of the air is upward.
  • This upward motion of the heated air carries the heat away from the hot light bulb by convection. Transfer of heat by convection may be hastened by using a ventilating fan to move the air surrounding a hot object. The rate of cooling of a hot electronics component, such as the CPU in a computer, can be increased if it is provided with copper fins that conduct heat away from the hot surface. The fins provide large surfaces against which cool air can be blown.
  • A convection process may take place in a liquid as well as in a gas. A good example of this is a pan of water sitting on the stove. The bottom of the pan becomes hot because it conducts heat from the surface it is in contact with. The water on the bottom of the pan also heats up because of conduction. As the heated water starts to rise and cooler water moves in to take its place, the convection process begins.
  • When the circulation of gas or liquid is not rapid enough to remove sufficient heat, fans or pumps are used to accelerate the motion of the cooling material. In some installations, pumps are used to circulate water or oil to help cool large equipment. In airborne installations, electric fans and blowers are used to aid convection.


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